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Pediatric Advance Life Support

The PALS Course has been updated to reflect new science in the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC. This classroom, Instructor-led course uses a series of videos and simulated pediatric emergencies to reinforce the important concepts of a systematic approach to pediatric assessment, basic life support, PALS treatment algorithms, effective resuscitation, and team dynamics. The goal of the PALS Course is to improve the quality of care provided to seriously ill or injured children, resulting in improved outcomes.

Features

  • Classroom-based courses work well for learners who prefer group interaction and instructor feedback while learning
  • Course includes realistic, clinical scenarios that encourage active participation – delivered through actual pediatric patient videos and lifelike simulations
  • Course is comprehensive and includes our systematic approach to assess and treat pediatric patients in emergency situations
  • Course uses a hands-on class format to reinforce skills proficiency
  • Co-branded with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Course Content

  • High-quality Child CPR AED and Infant CPR
  • Recognition of patients who do and do not require immediate intervention
  • Recognition of cardiopulmonary arrest early and application of CPR within 10 seconds
  • Apply team dynamics
  • Differentiation between respiratory distress and failure
  • Early interventions for respiratory distress and failure
  • Differentiation between compensated and decompensated (hypotensive) shock
  • Early interventions for the treatment of shock
  • Differentiation between unstable and stable patients with arrhythmias
  • Clinical characteristics of instability in patients with arrhythmias
  • Post–cardiac arrest management

This course is for all Healthcare providers, including nursing students.

Student Materials

  • 15-1058 PALS Provider Manual (includes PALS Pocket Reference Card)
  • 15-3120 PALS Provider Manual eBook (includes PALS Digital Reference Card)
  • 15-1050 PALS Emergency Crash Cart Cards
  • 15-1046 PALS Pocket Reference Card
  • 15-3121 PALS Digital Reference Card

Course Format

  • Full course: 13 hours 40 minutes, plus additional time for breaks and lunch
  • Update course, with all optional stations: 8 hours 20 minutes, plus additional time for breaks and lunch
  • Update without optional stations: 6 hours 20 minutes, plus additional time for breaks and lunch

Course Completion Card

Students who successfully complete the PALS Course will receive a PALS Provider course completion card (print or eCard), valid for two years:

  • Actively participate in, practice and complete all learning stations
  • Complete the open-resource written exam with a minimum score of 84%
  • Pass the 1- and 2-Rescuer Child BLS With AED and 1- and 2-Rescuer Infant BLS Skills Tests
  • Pass 2 PALS core case scenarios (1 cardiac and 1 respiratory or shock) as a team leader, providing appropriate medical treatment and demonstrating effective team dynamics

Continuing Education

ACCREDITATION STATEMENT – PALS Provider Course
Continuing Education Accreditation – Emergency Medical Services

This continuing education activity is approved by the American Heart Association, an organization accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Pre-Hospital Continuing Education (CAPCE), for 12.75 Advanced CEHs, activity number 16-AMHA-F2-0338.

By claiming CAPCE credit, the claimant acknowledges the following: I understand that the American Heart Association as a requirement of CAPCE accreditation will submit a record of my course completions to the CAPCE AMS. I further understand that my course completion records may be accessed by or shared with such regulators as state EMS offices, training officers, and NREMT on a password-protected, need-to-know basis. In addition, I understand that I may review my record of CAPCE-accredited course completions by contacting CAPCE.

**CAPCE credit must be claimed within 6 months of participation. CME/CE credit will no longer be available once the six-month credit claiming period has elapsed.
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ACCREDITATION STATEMENT – PALS Update Course
Continuing Education Accreditation – Emergency Medical Services

This continuing education activity is approved by the American Heart Association, an organization accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Pre-Hospital Continuing Education (CAPCE), for 7.00 Advanced CEHs, activity number 16-AMHA-F2-0337.

By claiming CAPCE credit, the claimant acknowledges the following: I understand that the American Heart Association as a requirement of CAPCE accreditation will submit a record of my course completions to the CAPCE AMS. I further understand that my course completion records may be accessed by or shared with such regulators as state EMS offices, training officers, and NREMT on a password-protected, need-to-know basis. In addition, I understand that I may review my record of CAPCE-accredited course completions by contacting CAPCE.

**CAPCE credit must be claimed within 6 months of participation. CME/CE credit will no longer be available once the six-month credit claiming period has elapsed.

Visit one of the AHA Approved Distributors to purchase course materials.

Channing Bete Company

Laerdal Medical Corporation

WorldPoint

Shop AHA eBooks to purchase digital course materials required for your class.

Go to eBooks.heart.org.

Cardiac Arrest vs. Heart Attack

(Source: American Heart Association)

People often use these terms interchangeably, but they are not the same.

Download Cardiac Arrest vs. Heart Attack (PDF opens new window)

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly.

Cardiac arrest is an “ELECTRICAL” problem.

Cardiac arrest is triggered by an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia). With its pumping action disrupted, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs.

WHAT HAPPENS
Seconds later, a person becomes unresponsive, is not breathing or is only gasping. Death occurs within minutes if the victim does not receive treatment.

WHAT TO DO
Cardiac arrest can be reversible in some victims if it’s treated within a few minutes.
•  First, call 9-1-1 and start CPR right away.
•  Then, if an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is available, use it as soon as possible.
•  If two people are available to help, one should begin CPR immediately while the other calls 9-1-1 and finds an AED.

Fast Action Can Save Lives

WHAT IS THE LINK?
Most heart attacks do not lead to cardiac arrest. But when cardiac arrest occurs, heart attack is a common cause. Other conditions may also disrupt the heart’s rhythm and lead to cardiac arrest.

What is a Heart Attack?

A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked.

A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem.

A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die.

WHAT HAPPENS?
Symptoms of a heart attack may be immediate and may include intense discomfort in the chest or other areas of the upper body, shortness of breath, cold sweats, and/or nausea/vomiting. More often, though, symptoms start slowly and persist for hours, days or weeks before a heart attack. Unlike with cardiac arrest, the heart usually does not stop beating during a heart attack. The longer the person goes without treatment, the greater the damage.

The heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men (shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain).

WHAT TO DO
Even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack, call 9-1-1 or your emergency response number. Every minute matters! It’s best to call EMS to get to the emergency room right away. Emergency medical services staff can begin treatment when they arrive — up to an hour sooner than if someone gets to the hospital by car. EMS staff are also trained to revive someone whose heart has stopped. Patients with chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too.

Fast Action Can Save Lives