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Advance Cardiac Life Support

The ACLS Course has been updated to reflect new science in the 2015 American Heart Association Guidelines Update for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. This course builds on the foundation of lifesaving BLS skills, emphasizing the importance of continuous, high-quality CPR.

This advanced course highlights the importance of high-performance team dynamics and communication, systems of care, recognition and intervention of cardiopulmonary arrest, immediate post-cardiac arrest, acute dysrhythmia, stroke, and acute coronary syndromes (ACS).

Features

  • Course uses learning stations for practice of essential skills simulated clinical scenarios that encourage Active participation
  • Hands-on class format reinforces skills proficiency
  • Classroom-based works well for learners who prefer group interaction and instructor feedback while learning skills

Course Content

  • Basic life support skills, including effective chest compressions, use of a bag-mask device, and use of an AED
  • Recognition and early management of respiratory and cardiac arrest
  • Recognition and early management of peri-arrest conditions such as symptomatic bradycardia
  • Airway management
  • Related pharmacology
  • Management of ACS and stroke
  • Effective communication as a member and leader of a resuscitation team

This course is for all Healthcare providers, including nursing students.

Student Materials

15-1005 ACLS Provider Manual, includes ACLS Pocket Reference Card Set
15-1007 ACLS Pocket Reference Card Set (set of 2)

Course Format

Classroom-based (instructor and video, with skills conducted throughout)

  • Initial Provider Course requires approximately 15 hours 20 minutes to complete, including skills practice and skills testing.
  • Update Course requires approximately 8 hours 25 minutes, including skills practice and skills testing.
*course time based on 1 instructor: 6 student: 2 manikins

Course Completion Card

AHA ACLS Provider Course Completion Card, valid for two years .

Continuing Education

Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) Provider Course; ECC Training Network

ACCREDITATION STATEMENTS:

Continuing Education Accreditation – Emergency Medical Services
This continuing education activity is approved by the American Heart Association, an organization accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Pre-Hospital Continuing Education (CAPCE), for 9.75 Advanced CEHs, activity number 16-AMHA-F2-0309.


Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) Classroom-Based Update Course, ECC Training Network

ACCREDITATION STATEMENTS:

Continuing Education Accreditation – Emergency Medical Services
This continuing education activity is approved by the American Heart Association, an organization accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Pre-Hospital Continuing Education (CAPCE), for 4.75 Advanced CEHs, activity number 16-AMHA-F2-0310.

Visit one of the AHA Approved Distributors to purchase course materials.

Channing Bete Company

Laerdal Medical Corporation

WorldPoint

Shop AHA eBooks to purchase digital course materials required for your class.

Go to eBooks.heart.org.

Cardiac Arrest vs. Heart Attack

(Source: American Heart Association)

People often use these terms interchangeably, but they are not the same.

Download Cardiac Arrest vs. Heart Attack (PDF opens new window)

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly.

Cardiac arrest is an “ELECTRICAL” problem.

Cardiac arrest is triggered by an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia). With its pumping action disrupted, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs.

WHAT HAPPENS
Seconds later, a person becomes unresponsive, is not breathing or is only gasping. Death occurs within minutes if the victim does not receive treatment.

WHAT TO DO
Cardiac arrest can be reversible in some victims if it’s treated within a few minutes.
•  First, call 9-1-1 and start CPR right away.
•  Then, if an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is available, use it as soon as possible.
•  If two people are available to help, one should begin CPR immediately while the other calls 9-1-1 and finds an AED.

Fast Action Can Save Lives

WHAT IS THE LINK?
Most heart attacks do not lead to cardiac arrest. But when cardiac arrest occurs, heart attack is a common cause. Other conditions may also disrupt the heart’s rhythm and lead to cardiac arrest.

What is a Heart Attack?

A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked.

A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem.

A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die.

WHAT HAPPENS?
Symptoms of a heart attack may be immediate and may include intense discomfort in the chest or other areas of the upper body, shortness of breath, cold sweats, and/or nausea/vomiting. More often, though, symptoms start slowly and persist for hours, days or weeks before a heart attack. Unlike with cardiac arrest, the heart usually does not stop beating during a heart attack. The longer the person goes without treatment, the greater the damage.

The heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men (shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain).

WHAT TO DO
Even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack, call 9-1-1 or your emergency response number. Every minute matters! It’s best to call EMS to get to the emergency room right away. Emergency medical services staff can begin treatment when they arrive — up to an hour sooner than if someone gets to the hospital by car. EMS staff are also trained to revive someone whose heart has stopped. Patients with chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too.

Fast Action Can Save Lives